CASUARINA SQUARE – LARRAKIA COUNTRY

WE ACKNOWLEDGE THE LARRAKIA PEOPLE AS THE TRADITIONAL CUSTODIANS OF THE LAND ON WHICH CASUARINA SQUARE RESIDES. WE ACKNOWLEDGE THE ELDERS, BOTH PAST, PRESENT AND EMERGING.

Casuarina Square rests on the traditional land of the Larrakia Nation. The original language name of the group now known as Larrakia is Gulumirrgin (pronounced Goo-loo-midgin). Larrakia people are known as “saltwater people” and had trading routes extending down the western side of the Northern Territory.

The Larrakia’s traditional society was based on a close relationship with the seas, and trade with neighbouring groups such as the Tiwi, Wagait and Wulna. Today, the Larrakia are a vibrant nation numbering around 2,000 people. Larrakia are broadly recognised for their strengths in performance, music and art, and many Larrakia have achieved success as doctors, lawyers, athletes and hold senior positions in government and other organisations.

At Casuarina Square, we extend a warm welcome to all First Nations people, and pay our respect to their ongoing connection to land, water and community.

Cultural Protocols for Visitors

The Larrakia people have developed a set of cultural protocols for visitors to Larrakia land through the Community Harmony Project. These protocols apply to both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal visitors and both temporary visitors and residents on Larrakia Country.

They are as follows:

  1. The Larrakia people are the Aboriginal traditional owners of all land and waters of the greater Darwin area including identified Aboriginal living areas.
  2. Aboriginal lore/law requires respect for the cultural authority of the traditional owners.
  3. Larrakia speak for Larrakia country; other traditional owners speak for their traditional lands.
  4. We have a mutual obligation to care for our country with our neighbours.
  5. Visitors should be aware that we have a body of knowledge in our land and waters, which includes sites of significance.
  6. Larrakia people expect visitors and service providers to be aware of Larrakia cultural obligations and to respect and acknowledge them.
  7. Visitors have the right to be treated with respect and understanding.
  8. All visitors are responsible for their behaviour and should respect guidance of Larrakia.
  9. Learning about country is everybody’s responsibility and it is also the responsibility of government and non-government agencies.
  10. Inappropriate behaviour reflects badly on Larrakia people and we do not accept it.

"We talk to the country, our country talks to us. This is Larrakia country, we are Larrakia people and we will always be here. Please respect our country."

Barbara Mills-Raymond, 2005